BTVC Autism Chapter Counselors "SCD Solutions" Elaine’s Story Top 10 FAQs Food Preparation Goat Yogurt
Holiday Ideas Local & Online Support Overcoming Difficulties Parents' Reports Probiotics Recipes
Research SCD™ Links SCD™ Science Search Pecanbread Seizures Supplements


Overcoming Difficulties




Topics:

Chelation issues
Child consumed something illegal
Child is allergic (anaphylaxis) to nuts
Child is an extremely picky eater
Child is sensitive to phenols
Child is responding negatively to SCD™ or is not making any progress
Child still shows signs of malabsorption
Child takes illegal medication that has no legal version
Child won't eat foods on intro diet
Report Problems with SCD™
SCD™ Counselors to help with difficulties
School parties and other social events
Unsupportive family members and school staff




Chelation issues

We believe that the SCD™ is the best diet to follow to keep bacteria and yeast overgrowth under control.
It is well-known fact that chelating agents such as DMSA and ALA create or worsen bacterial and/or yeast overgrowths. We cannot guarantee the same degree of success with controling yeast and bacteria if a child is undergoing chelation.
Any medical treatment is a choice that must be made by the parent and the child's health care provider.
Parents need to know that by administering agents which contribute to bacterial and yeast overgrowths, that the bacteria and yeast may NOT be able to be controlled by the SCD™ alone.


Back to topics


Child consumed something illegal

It happens to the best of us. If the child regresses, go back to a more basic diet for a few days.

Sometimes a parent is giving child an illegal food by mistake. Double check the legality of the foods on this website: Breaking the Vicious Cycle.

If the child is sneaking illegal foods, investigate and try to eliminate any chance for infractions. Put the cat food up. Attempt to get any illegals out of reach, out of sight or completely out of the house. Even the school bus driver can be giving your child snacks without your knowledge. It is imperative that you have the support of anyone your child comes in regular contact with, including teachers, babysitters, and family members.

Back to topics


Child is allergic (anaphylaxis) to nuts

IMPORTANT: Foods that that cause an anaphylactic reaction (severe allergic reaction), should permanently be eliminated from the diet.

Elaine writes: “Some of the allergy testing is far from accurate. However, if you have ever had an anaphylactic reaction to a nut or another food, stay away from it forever and ever.”

It is recommended that any food the child has had a severe reaction to should be avoided.

For those who can't do any nuts, there are still many options that can be enjoyed with meat, veggies, fruit and SCD™-legal dairy. Nuts are not an essential part of this diet. The SCD™ without the use of nuts is still a very healthy diet.
Some very creative moms have come up with recipes for pancakes and cupcakes that do not use any type of flour.

Back to topics


Child is an extremely picky eater

Sometimes kids are picky because they are self-limited to foods that harm them. Sometimes kids are picky because they want sameness and routine. Sometimes kids are picky for sensory reasons. Sometimes kids are picky for who knows what reason. The good news is that plenty of picky eaters have survived and thrived on SCD™. And, even better news, some parents of picky eaters report that their children become much more adventerous after some time on SCD™. As the gut heals, cravings for harmful foods should fade and sensory issues often--though not always--fade.

Here are some tips for parents of picky eaters:
  • For children who refuse all SCD™-legal foods, see the pecanbread section entitled "Transitioning a Child to SCD™" under the heading "Food Prep."

  • Veggies can be hidden. The easiest to disguise are zucchini, yellow squash, and cauliflower (especially mashed and pureed.) These can be used in muffins and SCD™-legal lasagne and breads, to name a few. Some have even used baked pureed squash in muffins as a binder replacement for eggs. Greens are trickier but workable, especially in meat dishes like meat balls. Spinach chopped really, really small can look like spice--for the picky child who is not offended by spice. Creativity is the name of this game.

  • Go through all the SCD™ recipes you can find. Some overtly veggie-based recipes, like squash fries, are kid favorites.

  • Some parents have used ABA techniques to encourage eating new foods. For example, every new food eaten gets a reward. And maybe that reward could be a desired SCD™-legal food.

  • Some parents have used the method of allowing one bite of a preferred food in exchange for one bite of a less preferred food.

  • Parents of kids with sensory issues have successfully gotten their kids to eat veggies inn the following ways:

    • Pureeing a veggie into babyfood consistency.
    • Steaming miscellaneous veggies then pureeing them with salt and water to create a homemade "V8".
    • Using a turkey baster to drop a little bit of a pureed veggie into their child's mouth. The parent who used this method reported that it took a long time before it got easy. Sometimes her daughter would take only a bite then quit. Patience, patience, patience.....

  • In general, with sensory-picky-eaters, parents need to experiment with different textures (though pureed seems to be a favorite), colors and smells. One mother reported that she herself is nauseated the color orange. Play detective: try to find consistencies in what your child gravitates to and what they recoil from.

  • Sometimes a Sensory Integration Occupational Therapist can help with feeding challenges.

  • Cook a food you want your child to have in as many different ways as possible. Ground beef, for example, can be burgers, meatloaf, a pizza topping etc.

  • In homes where the entire family is follwing the SCD™, some picky eaters eventually come around when they repeatedly see a particular food enjoyed by everybody else. Reverse psychology often works well in this situation: don't care one bit whether or not your child joins in. The food is for everybody else, not your picky eater.
In general, we cannot control what our children put in their mouths, chew and swallow. And we don't want to be forcing anything in. But we can, for the most part, control what they don't put in their mouths. On close inspection, you might find that, eating SCD™, your confirmed picky eater is taking in a more balanced diet than you thought.

For a behavioral approach to getting your picky eater to try new foods, please read this article from TACA (Talk About Curing Autism): Picky Kids, Eating, And Autism Creative ways for healthy nutrition by Lisa Ackerman.



Back to topics


Child is sensitive to phenols

Many parents report that their children have problems with foods that are high in phenols. Parents report the need to follow the Feingold diet. The Feingold diet protocol removes foods high in salicylates. After a period of 4-6 weeks, the non-artificial foods (fruits and vegetables) should be able to be added back into the diet. This does not seem to be the case for ASD kids who follow the Feingold diet. The foods are not able to be reintroduced as the protocol suggests.
The underlying problem with phenol sensitivity seen in kids with ASD may very well be leaky gut syndrome. It has been seen numerous times that once kids follow the SCD™ and their GI tracts begin to heal, they are able to eat phenolic foods that were previously not tolerated.
When beginning the SCD™, it is not required to eat the foods that are high in phenols, but in time, it may be possible to resume eating the foods that are high in phenols with no negative reactions.
A child may also benefit from using an enzyme such as No Fenol to help with highly phenolic foods.

Back to topics


Child is responding negatively to SCD or is not making any progress

It is not unusual for kids to have some negative reactions at first as bacterial overgrowth and yeast “die off”, releasing toxins. This could manifest itself as behavioral symptoms (stimming, tantrums, etc.) or physical symptoms such as nausea, headache, or even fever. Give child lots of love during this difficult time. Try epsom salt baths and activated charcoal supplements. Check out the Initial bad reactions link for more details.

Keeping a food journal often helps determine if certain legal foods are not tolerated. Until some gut healing takes place, some of the SCD™ legal foods may need to be avoided. If this is the case there are often legal substitutes available. Examples: For those that don't tolerate almond flour, there is pecan or filbert flour. For those children that don't tolerate eggs at the beginning there are egg-free recipes (see Food Preparation page). Manufactured foods that have not been listed as legal either in BTVC or on Elaine’s website: Breaking the Vicious Cycle could possibly have illegal ingredients and might be interfering with progress. Double check all the products you are using. If you are not seeing as much improvement as you were hoping to, please pull all possible illegals for a time and see if that makes a difference.

Also, take a close look at the supplements your child is receiving. There may be illegal ingredients which are causing problems. Please check the SCD™ Supplement List to see if you can find a suitable legal supplement to replace any illegal ones your child might be currently taking.

Back to topics


Child still shows signs of malabsorption

If you suspect continuing malabsorbtion issues (undigested food in stools, etc.), your child may benefit from digestive enzyme supplements.

Some legal enzymes by brand name:

Peptizyde by Houston Nutraceuticals, Inc.
No Fenol by Houston Nutraceuticals, Inc.
H N-Zyme Prime by Houston Nutraceuticals, Inc.

Digest Gold by Enzymedica
Ultra-zyme Plus by Thorp Nutrition
Vitase Digestion Formula

EnZymAid by Kirkman Labs
Enzym-Complete/DPP IV by Kirkman Labs
Multi-Enzyme Formula by Kirkman Labs
Peptidase Complete by Kirkman Labs

Back to topics


Child takes illegal medication that has no legal version

If your child is taking prescription medication that contains illegals, first check with your pharmacist to find out if the med might possibly be available in another form that might be legal. Some medications can be specially compounded. If not, and the medication is essential, continue giving it and simply do the best you can in every other aspect of the diet. You may find that some prescriptions, such as antacids or laxatives, may no longer be needed once the child is on SCD™ but this decision is up to you and your physician. Do not attempt to stop any medication for seizures or for mood or behavior disorders without discussing the preferred protocol for weaning the drug with your child’s doctor.

Back to topics


Child won't eat foods on intro diet

Think like a kid for the intro. Here’s a few suggestions:
For the homemade gelatin - cut it into kid shapes.
If he/she won't eat eggs you could mix them, cook them flat & then cut them into more shapes.
Try apple cider or grape juice (1/2 juice, 1/2 water) frozen into popsicles.
The broiled beef patty can instead be rolled into little kid-size meatballs.

Unless symptoms are severe (cramping and diarrhea), one or two days on the intro diet are sufficient. If your child refuses to eat the intro diet foods, simply do the best you can to provide a very simple diet of easily digestible SCD™ legal foods. Get as close as you can to the intro diet with just a few basic foods you know your child can tolerate and will eat. After that, introduce new foods slowly. You may be able to return to a stricter intro diet later for a day or two to jump-start further progress.

Back to topics


Report Problems with SCD

If you are having problems with SCD™, please go to the Problem Report Form. Follow the directions on the page to submit the report.

Back to topics


SCD™ Counselors to help with difficulties

If you are interested in a private SCD™ Counselor to help with difficulties, please contact the webmaster to obtain a list of private counselors.

Back to topics


School parties and other social events

These events are most difficult to deal with during the beginning stages of the diet. Once nut flours and baked good can be well tolerated, there are many options for providing yummy treats for these occasions. There are recipes for cookies, cakes and other treats on the Food Preparation page.

Some suggestions for fun treats that do not contain nuts would be: homemade gelatin cut into shapes with cookie cutters, homemade popsicles, and fruit salad.

Back to topics


Unsupportive family members and school staff

Sharing a brief overview of the science behind the SCD™ and a list of legal/illegal foods could help gain the support of family and school staff. Oftentimes people are more willing to be cooperative with special dietary restrictions when they understand that there is a real reason for the diet.
A copy of the SCD Autism Summary could be printed out and shared with family members and school staff.

Back to topics




DISCLAIMER: This site is for informational purposes only.

© COPYRIGHT NOTICE !
The contents of this site are copyrighted, all rights reserved, and may not be reproduced, electronically scanned
or downloaded, either in whole or in part, without written permission of the owner.